26 Galileo satellites now in orbit for improved EU satellite navigation signal

Written by on July 26, 2018 in Europe - Comments Off on 26 Galileo satellites now in orbit for improved EU satellite navigation signal

Four more Galileo satellites were successfully launched on July 25 from the European spaceport in French Guiana on the European launcher Ariane-5, the European Commission said.

“Now with a constellation of 26 satellites, the EU’s global satellite navigation system will provide a more precise signal across a range of valuable services,” the Commission said.

Galileo has been providing positioning and timing services to about 400 million users since December 2016.

The July 25 launch brings the constellation close to completion in 2020, which is when Galileo will reach full operational capability.

“Once complete and with a record precision of 20cm, Galileo will be the most precise satellite navigation system in the world,” the statement said.

Space may be far away but its technology, data and services have become indispensable in our daily lives, be it in rescue searches, connected cars, smart watches, farming or plane navigation, the Commission said.

“The European space industry is strong and competitive, creating jobs and business opportunities for entrepreneurs. For the next long-term EU budget 2021-2027, the Commission is proposing to bring all existing and new space activities under the umbrella of one single 16 billion euro ‘EU Space Programme’.”

Galileo currently provides three types of satellite navigation based services:

  • Galileo Open Service: a free service for positioning, navigation and timing. The timing service is increasingly robust, accurate and fast (in order of nanoseconds) compared to other location systems. It enables the eCall system, which has been mandatory in all new cars in the EU since March 31 2018, to communicate the vehicle’s location to emergency services.

  • Galileo’s Search and Rescue (SAR) Service: localisation of distress signals from an enabled beacon. With the start of Galileo initial services in December 2016, the time it takes to detect a person lost at sea or in the mountains after a distress beacon is activated was reduced from up to four hours to about 10 minutes . The accuracy of localisation has improved too, from 10km without Galileo to less than two km with Galileo. As of next year, the service will also send back a signal informing the person in danger that the distress signal has been picked up and localised.

  • Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS): an encrypted service designed for public authorities for security sensitive use, for instance military operations. PRS aims at ensuring service continuity, even in the most adverse environment. It offers a particularly robust and fully encrypted service for government users during national emergencies or crisis situations, such as terrorist attacks.

Anyone with a Galileo enabled device is able to use its signals for positioning, navigation and timing. Galileo services are based on highly accurate signals, but during the current initial phase they are not available all the time and therefore are used in combination with other satellite navigation systems such as GPS. Every addition to the constellation gradually improves Galileo availability and performance worldwide. Once the constellation reaches 30 satellites in 2020, Galileo will be fully operational and independent, meaning that a position could be established autonomously everywhere and anytime using Galileo satellites only.

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